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Newsletter 2-12-20

Earlier ones

Newsletter 10-3-20 
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Newsletter 1-3-19
Newsletter 1-12-18
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Newsletter 18-4-18
Newsletter 18-1-18
Newsletter 1-11-17
Newsletter 17-09-17
Newsletter 17-07-17
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Newsletter 17-02-17
Newsletter 16-12-16
Newsletter-16-09-16
Newsletter 16-07-16
Newsletter 15-09-15

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2 weeks ago

floatourboat17

Work is continuing to get Baden Powell ready for the new season. Many thanks to Teamac Paints for their quality paints, sponsoring us and to all our volunteers like Stuart here. ...

Work is continuing to get Baden Powell ready for the new season. Many thanks to Teamac Paints for their quality paints, sponsoring us and to all our volunteers like Stuart here.

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Please let me know when you are doing trips again.😁😁

Coming on nicely , we’ll soon be dropping her back in for you .

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2 months ago

floatourboat17

Last year at this time we were launching Baden Powell for hopefully (sadly mistaken) a good summer sailing running trips.
This year Baden Powell has been in the docks until yesterday when we were eventually able to get her out of the water for essential maintenance.
Using strict covid precautions we got her out into Travis Perkins yard and were very surprised than there were virtually no banacles on the hull. So a swift wash down with the pressure washer, some sanding to key the hull for the anti – fouling paint , other jobs and then we will be good to go in the water again.
Many thanks again to ABP for the craning, Carter transport for the use of strops and Travis Perkins for use of the yard.
...

Last year at this time we were launching Baden Powell for hopefully (sadly mistaken) a good summer sailing running trips. 
This year Baden Powell has been in the docks until yesterday when we were eventually able to get her out of the water for essential maintenance. 
Using strict covid precautions we got her out into Travis Perkins yard and were very surprised than there were virtually no banacles on the hull. So a swift wash down with the pressure washer, some sanding to key the hull for the anti – fouling paint , other jobs and then we will be good to go in the water again. 
Many thanks again to ABP for the craning, Carter transport for the use of strops and Travis Perkins for use of the yard.Image attachment

2 months ago

floatourboat17

Baden Powell is still in the water in the Bentink dock but as Covid hopefully eases it will be all hands on deck getting her out of the water, scrubbing off the barnacles, repainting and back into the water asap.
Last year when we went out of the docks into the Ouse I thought this was interesting. Its the dock gates with the original brick and stonework from 1869 and you can see the original water level measurement in roman characters. We will hopefully be passing here again soon.
...

Baden Powell is still in the water in the Bentink dock but as Covid hopefully eases it will be all hands on deck getting her out of the water, scrubbing off the barnacles, repainting and back into the water asap. 
    Last year when we went out of the docks into the Ouse I thought this was interesting. Its the dock gates with the original brick and stonework from 1869 and you can see the original water level measurement in roman characters. We will hopefully be passing here again soon.

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Remember the Bentink dock so well as I visited there on so many occasions in my youth to go to the Worfolk Bros workshop there at the time. A learning process and many memories.....😀

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This week’s #FactFriday post will be looking at the boat building family the Worfolks [TY1995.2226], who built over 600 boats over 80 years - many of which were for the fisherfolk community of King's Lynn, Norfolk’s North End.

Walter 'Chappie' Worfolk [TY1993.1600] was born in 1864 in Stainforth, Doncaster, United Kingdom. Walter married Lily Maria Florence Silvester (pictured in TY1995.2202, c1910) in 1886. The son of a boat builder he moved his family to King’s Lynn in 1899 and started his own business.

Walter’s first commission was the Baden Powell [TY2000.4591] for the Cook brothers in 1900. He quoted them £50 and they were so pleased with his work they paid £55. In 2017 a 12 year restoration of the Baden Powell was completed by floatourboat17

.Walter Worfolk started out by renting Metcalf’s boatyard, but in 1904 he moved to Friars boatyard [TY1989.383], which was located at the end of Gladstone Road near the river Nar. The Charlotte & Louisa (LN 35) was the first boat he built there [TY1989.325].

In 1905 Gerald Worfolk began his boat building apprenticeship under his father, followed by his brother William 3 years later. Traditionally an apprenticeship would last 7 years, but Walter insisted his sons serve 8 years each. They earned sixpence a week. [TY1993.1601 & TY1995.2197]

Gerald Worfolk completed his apprenticeship in 1913 and his wages increased to 21 shillings a week. This allowed him to marry Charlotte Rake (pictured with their son Stephen in TY1993.1599) in the same year. William married Ethel Leman in 1917 [TY1995.2201].

Walter Worfolk built the Retriever (previously the Britannia) [TY1989.323] for Alf Rake (his daughter-in-law Charlotte’s father). According to our records she was often sailed at a reckless speed! She was extensively refitted as a sailing ship in 2008.

When building a boat the Worfolks would first sketch it and then build a scale model to show the owner. The Nellie & Leslie was launched in May 1914 (TY1989.345 shows her design). She was used for prawning and spratting. She was later restored [TY1995.2207] and berthed in Bremerhaven, Germany.

According to Bill Worfolk it would take him and his brother, Gerald, about 4 months to build a fishing smack (although they once built a 12ft dinghy in 4 days). A fishing smack could cost £250-£300. [TY2000.4561]

Following Walter Worfolk’s death in 1947 his sons moved to a smaller boatyard on the King’s Lynn Docks [TY2007.6858c & TY2000.4560], since most of their customers were fishermen.

Worfolk boats included the Queen Alexandra [TY2000.4652] (which Gunton Bunn had built for £110 to win the Regatta), the ESF patrol vessel the Seafish [TY2007.6828] and the Eric Brown (also known as the United and the Christina Lynn) [TY2000.4614 & TY2000.4615] (which was described as a 'terrible ship in bad weather').

The last boat the Worfolk brothers built together was the Lady of Lynn (LN 107) for the pathologist Dr Richard Huntsman in 1977. Dr Huntsman and his daughter then sailed her across the Atlantic. The brothers came out of retirement to complete the project and Bill later described her as his favourite boat [TY1995.2196].

Gerald Worfolk died in 1981, but Bill continued to advise other local boat builders into his 90s. This included Paul Lake (who is restoring our fishing smack the Activity) and Vic Pratt. Vic (pictured on Bill’s left in TY1995.2199) was the brothers’ apprentice and became one of our trustees. Sadly Vic passed away in 2020. Please let us know if you can identify any of the other men in this photo.

Gerald Worfolk’s son, Stephen (pictured in TY1993.1602 and his wife Joyce in TY1993.1603, c1950), built model boats and wrote several monographs for the museum, such as ‘Whelks and Whelks Fishery at Lynn’ which is available for purchase in our gift shop.

Bill Worfolk [TY2002.6052] passed away in June 1994, aged 100 [TY2000.4555 & TY2000.4557]. He left behind an incredible boat building legacy. Thanks to restoration projects some of the Worfolk family’s boats are still sailing today.

If you have enjoyed this post and would like to support the True's Yard Fisherfolk Museum’s work you can donate online at: northendtrust.enthuse.com/donate#!/
...

Comment on Facebook

Ioved this article, thank you.

That makes really interesting reading. Thanks 👍

Thank you so much for the history 👌

One off the worfolk girls still live dersingham

Charlie Lee (Worfolk)

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Examining some of the photographs in our collection can give a fascinating insight into the evolution of fashion. So for this week’s #FactFriday post we are going to explore the changes in women’s fashion from 1860s-1910 in King's Lynn, Norfolk and discover how it can help us date photographs. [KLNTY2020.121, KLNTY2020.200, KLNTY2020.237 & KLNTY2020.249]

In the Victorian period women’s fashion went through a variety of silhouettes. Big skirts helped the waist appear smaller (so no need to tight-lace corsets). Stiffened or structured petticoats helped achieve this look, although by the mid-1850s they were replaced by hooped skirts or crinoline cages. This style continued into the early 1860s [KLNTY2020.99 & KLNTY2020.101].

Between 1862-68 the crinoline cages, rather than being equally circular all the way round, had shifted the emphasis to the back of the dress, as can be seen in KLNTY2020.130, KLNTY2020.166 and in the 1866 wedding photo of Thomas Senter and Elizabeth Bone [TY2007.6651].

By 1868 the crinoline cage had started to be flattened at the front, while maintaining volume in the skirts at the back. This can be clearly seen in KLNTY2020.171, which dates from 1868-70 and in KLNTY2020.174.

In TY2007.6501 Mary Ann Bailey (nee Fisher), who is pictured alongside her husband William (they were the parents of Harriet 'Lol' Benefer) in the early 1870s, is wearing a dress designed to cover a circular crinoline cage. The dress dates to the later 1860s and by the 1870s this style crinoline cage had gone out of fashion, so it has been removed and the voluminous skirt left unsupported.

In the early 1870s the bustle style became popular, which involved fabric draped over half-hoops at the back of the dress. [KLNTY2020.146 & KLNTY2020.156] The early 1870s also saw square necklines trimmed with ruffles or lace. The waistline was also raised to a higher than natural position.

Around 1876 the ‘princess-line’ silhouette became fashionable thanks to Alexandra, Princess of Wales. This style used long vertical tucks and darts to achieve its shape, rather than a horizontal seam at the waist. Corsets were lengthened over the hips and became tighter. Short curly fringes also started to make an appearance in hairstyles. [KLNTY2020.202 & KLNTY2020.203]

Throughout the early 1880s the body-hugging ‘princess-line’ dress continued to be a popular style and the bustle briefly disappeared entirely. [KLNTY2020.363 & KLNTY2020.226]

The bustle had returned by 1884 and this time was more rigidly structured. In the mid-1880s high collars also started to become more fashionable. [KLNTY2020.238, KLNTY2020.239 & KLNTY2020.242]

The bustle increased in size up to 1886 and then started to shrink around 1888. Elaborately decorated hats also became popular in the 1880s and the demand for feathers led to some species of birds becoming endangered (the RSPB Love Nature was founded in 1889 www.rspb.org.uk/about-the-rspb/about-us/our-history/). [KLNTY2020.382 & KLNTY2020.256]

KLNTY2020.260 demonstrates why you cannot completely rely on clothes to date a photograph. We know this was taken 1890-93 by the studio mount, however, the lady is wearing a bustle, which had disappeared by 1890s. Clearly she is wearing her best clothes for the occasion, even if they aren’t of the current fashion.

The sleeves of Miss Fayers’ dress [TY2001.5305] appear to be on the verge of burgeoning into the leg-of-mutton style which became fashionable in the mid-1890s, this therefore dates her photograph to around 1893/4. This also allows us to date the unknown couple in TY1996.2669 to a similar date.

Emily Johnson [TY1993.1802] is also wearing similar sleeves to the previous photographs. The smartness of her outfit suggests she is up-to-date with fashion trends and the picture could date as early as 1892. The photo was taken by Walter Sothern Dexter (father of the King’s Lynn artist Walter Dexter).

Emily Johnson appears again in TY1994.1950 with her sisters, Eleanor and Elizabeth. This time they are all wearing much larger leg-of-mutton style sleeves, which dates this photograph to the mid-1890s. This style can also be see in KLNTY2020.564.

Into the late 1890s and early 1900s corsets pushed the body into an S-shape, forcing the bust forward and the hips back. This was viewed as better than previous corset styles as it took pressure off the abdomen. Catherine Bunn (nee Blyth) is pictured in TY2007.6775 (around the time of her marriage in 1900) wearing a tailored blouse which was popular during this period.

Erin Petts and Bill Hendry [TY1989.150] are probably pictured 1901-05 as Erin hasn’t got the big hair style needed to support the big hats (with the help of pins) which became popular later in the Edwardian period. Her sleeves are also full on the lower arm which also suggests the first few years of the century.

The hats worn by the 3 ladies pictured with Matthew ‘Cricket’ Smith in TY1989.188 confirm its dating of c1907. By this point Edwardian hats had got very big and could resemble a gateau (see lady on the left). However, a new hat was a relatively affordable way of updating your look.

Pictured in TY1995.2202 is Walter 'Chappie' Worfolk the boat builder (including floatourboat17) and his wife. She is wearing a style of hat which was popular in the second half of the Edwardian period, which confirms the photograph’s date as c1910.

A massive thank you to Bob Pols for his assistance with this post! For more information about the history of women’s fashion check out: fashionhistory.fitnyc.edu/about-timeline/ If you have enjoyed this post and would like to support the Museum’s work you can donate online at: northendtrust.enthuse.com/donate#!/
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Fascinating - thanks for posting!

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